Rights and Restrictions Relative to Christianity

There is nothing special about Christianity.

I do not mean this as an attack, but as a rational assessment.

Generally speaking, there is nothing unique or distinctive concerning Christianity, relative to  other organized religions:

–  There is nothing unique and exclusive with regards to the Theology of Christianity.

–  There is nothing unique with regards to the general doctrines of Christianity.

–  There is nothing unique with regards to the social history of Christianity.

–  There is nothing unique with regards to the moral and ethical teachings of Christianity.

1.   As to the Theology of Christianity, their god is like most other gods.  Even the Bible presents Yahweh as merely a god among the many deities whose allotted reign was over the Israelites.  It was only after the fall of the nation of Israel to foreign powers (and foreign gods), that Yahweh evolves in biblical literature to the status of “the one and only god and there is none other”.  The roots of most monotheistic religions can usually be traced to pagan ritual and polytheism, and Christianity is by no means an exception in this regard.

There seems then to be nothing unique and exclusive with regards to the Theology of Christianity.

2.  As to the general religious doctrines of Christianity, their practices, rituals, teachings, and beliefs are basically like those of most other religions.  Like Old Testament Judaism, other regional religions (aka: “pagan”) of that era erected temples on behalf of and offered burnt sacrifices to their pagan deities.  Like New Testament Christianity, other pagan religions of that era practiced baptisms, feared hell and coveted heaven, trusted in virgin born male saviors, and believed in the resurrection of the dead.  The fact is that several cultures who predate the Hebrew nation of Israel had their own creation myths, feared and worshipped their own pagan deities, and some even trusted their eternal state to virgin born god/men saviors.  The roots of most pagan religions are embedded in such beliefs and practices, and Christianity is by no means an exception in this regard.

There seems then to be nothing unique and exclusive with regards to the general religious doctrines of Christianity.

3.  As to the social history of Christianity, their collective conduct with regards to the maltreatment of others and the exploitation of respective governing powers to that end is a matter of record, and demonstrates means, motives, and manners similar to most other state sponsored religions.  At times Christians have been tortured, maimed, and murdered due to their beliefs.  Then again, Christians have at times tortured, maimed, and murdered others due to their rejection of the Christian faith.  It is only in the modern era of history that Christianity has mellowed to the point of merely censoring those whose faiths differ from their own.  The roots of many pagan religions are soaked with a bloody history of extreme intolerance, and Christianity is by no means an exception in this regard.

There seems then to be nothing unique and exclusive with regards to the social history of Christianity.

4.  As to the moral and ethical teachings of Christianity, their doctrines regarding individual social behaviour are generally the same as those of most other religions and societies.  The most fundamental teaching regarding ideal behavior is the principle of social reciprocity.  The basic principle of social reciprocity is to treat others as we would be treated, and to refrain from treating others as we would prefer to not be treated.  Christians know this as the Golden Rule, and cite Jesus as the source.  Yet, long before Jesus reportedly lived, the principle of social reciprocity was being taught in a variety of religions and societies.  The roots of most every pagan religion and civilized society are embedded in the theory that ideal behaviour is a matter of social reciprocity, and Christianity is by no means an exception in this regard.

There seems then to be nothing unique and exclusive with regards to the moral and ethical teachings of Christianity.

CONCLUSION:

Generally speaking, Christianity is neither unique nor distinctive relative to other organized religions.  Christianity then merits no special social rights, which are not likewise due to any other organized religion.  Thus, a free and civil society should recognize the basic right of all religions to assemble and worship privately, with no special rights to Christianity in this or any other regard.

At the same time, any free and civil society has a duty to censor all religious teachings and relics from the public domain if for no other purposes than sound rationale and social respect.   There being no distinct difference between Christianity and other organized religions, then such censorship simply must apply to Christianity as well.  

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