The Sand Creek Massacre: November 29, 1864

On this date, in the year 1864; the infamous slaughter of approximately 200 peaceful Native Americans by members of the US Military was executed at Sand Creek in the Colorado territory. The preparations by the US Government for the event were as sinister as was the brutality of the event itself.

For weeks leading up to the massacre, peaceful Indians were encouraged and enticed to assemble and dwell at Sand Creek under the guise of forming somewhat of a safety zone from the violence of allegedly “bad Indians” or any conflicts with the US Military who were patrolling the area in search of such alleged menaces to society. (Society of course being gold diggers who found the presence of the indigenous people an annoyance and a hindrance to their efforts). In retrospect, it is clear that the peaceful Indians who were assembling at Sand Creek were actually being corralled for the slaughter.

Having assembled a sufficient quorum for the killing, the commander who had arranged for the assembling of the Indians at Sand Creek, (who seems to have been sympathetic to the plight of the Native Americans) was suddenly recalled and replaced by a Christian Minister Military man by the name of Chivington. Chivington was a murderous mercenary who aspired to a career in politics, and who also believed in and commanded the genocide of the American Indian people.

And on this day in 1864, for a period of 6-8 hours, Chivington and his men did their part in an effort to such a very end.

The record of the atrocities afflicted against the unsuspecting Indians during the massacre consists primarily of two letters written a few weeks later by two Officers of character who refused to engage in the Sand Creek slaughter. The most outspoken of the pair was Silas Soule, who told his superiors and his men the night before the premeditated mass murder that any man who engaged in such an endeavor against the peaceful community was a “low life cowardly son of a bitch”. Although threatened to be hung if he did not take back his words and engage in the massacre, Soule stood by his words and the next day commanded his men to stand down when the killing commenced. (Soule was never executed as threatened, but he was murdered the next year in Denver. Soule’s murderer was never brought to justice, but years later would himself be buried with honors)

In closing my commentary as to the slaughter of the innocents at Sand Creek 153 years ago today, I offer the following three links which provide more history as to the event, including the text of the two aforementioned letters written by Soule and Cramer, a pair of men of character among the low life cowards who did in fact carry out the massacre itself. The third link is a personal letter which Soule wrote to his Mother; which is dated four days after his letter to the former commander Wynkoop (I must warn the reader that the letters of Soule and Cramer are graphic, and that the description of the slaughter involves bodily mutilation of the basest sort, and the slaughter of children who were begging for their lives; among other atrocities too gruesome to bear):

Soule’s Letter to Wynkoop (former Commander): 12.14.1864:

Cramer’s Letter (12.19.1864):

Soule’s letter to his Mother: 12.18.1864: